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. i plan to vote for this bill, h.r. 6156, even though i remain strongly opposed to granting russia permanent normal trade relations or pntr, at this time. i would like to explain the reasons why. those who argued for granting russia pntr, which has until now been prevented by what is known as the jackson-vanik amendment, focus on the supposedly bilateral trade benefits. the issue that concerns me and many members is not trade but human rights. advocates of repeal say that the jackson-vanik amendment is outdated and is purely symbolic and therefore should be disregarded. but in the ira of human rights, madam speaker, symbols can have a very great importance. over the years jackson-vanik has become a sign of the continuing u.s. commitment to human rights in russia and elsewhere. repealing the amendment could very well be interpreted as an indication that our commitment is now weakening. this would be a terrible signal to send at a time when putin is in the process of imposing ever tighter restrictions on all opposition to his regime, especially democratic activists and any others who
permanent normal trade relations to russia. this past august russia joined the world trade organization, giving its members full access to russia's rapidly growing market. reduce tariffs, and ensure transparency when implementing trade measures. however, while foreign competitors are currently benefiting, the u.s. will not receive any of these benefits until congress authorizes the president to grant russia permanent normal trade relations. simply put, american companies, workers, and farmers are being put at a competitive disadvantage. last year my home state of michigan exported $225 million worth of goods to russia. despite many of its best products facing tough competition from foreign competitors. with this agreement in place, farmers and producers in my district will be assured of more predictable market access for the crops and arkansas urel goods, while manufacturers will enjoy reduced tariff rates for michigan-made vehicles and equipment. as the world trade organization member, russia has agreed to comply with the rule of law. though these reforms won't happen overnight, russia
a historic arms control agreement with russia which has reduced the number of nuclear weapons that are actively deployed, and he has rebalanced and refocused american foreign policy to the most important region of the world, the asia pacific region. on the whole i would have to give him a very high marks. >> i see. how would you assess romney's approach to foreign policy? >> well, that's a good question. it is not clear what will be romney's approach to foreign policy because i think there are two romneys. there is the hawkish romney who seems to be wanting to pursue a policy that considers certain states as enemies, where military action may be seriously contemplated and he has referred to nuclear iran and syria, russia, as a big adversaries and then there is the other romney that we saw in the presidential debate and this romney was a romney that was much more moderate, realistic, and a presidential candidate who used the word peace so many times and much more than president obama. so we will know until he takes office who will not true romney in terms of foreign policy. >>
always spoke of russia in negative terms. of course i did not like that. that is why i was rooting for obama to win. >> obama always said he did not want another cold war, and that is a huge positive for the relationship between the u.s. and russia. the reaction from the kremlin was less enthusiastic. after putin was reelected, several meetings were scheduled and then canceled until he finally met with obama this summer. moscow was struggling to maintain its status as a world power, and that has made for confrontation with washington on a number of issues, from the war in syria to missile defense in europe. >> here, that ties are viewed as the norm, but that is not normal. it does damage. it prevents russia from fulfilling important tasks, especially the long-overdue process of modernization. >> right now, putin is keeping tight control on things at home, and he uses his opposition to america to rally the masses behind him. >> for more on what the president's reelection means for u.s. foreign policy, we are joined in the studio by markets of the swp german institute for internation
to deescalate this conflict. the european union weighed in today as did russia. russia preparing a u.n. resolution calling for a cease fire. probably our closest ally abroad in matters of war and peace is britain, and they are taking the same line as president obama, although they are being even more direct about it. the foreign secretary saying that hamas bares responsibility for what's going on, but he warns that "a ground invasion of gaza would lose israel a lot of the international support they have in this situation." a ground invasion is more difficult for the international community to sympathize with or support. so the world, at least the world of the united states and our allies is pretty much speaking with one voice here. israel, stop the ground work thing. that's the message from the president. that's the message from allies. that's the message from the international community. that's the message from the europeans. that's the message from the egyptians. and even though our own president is traveling abroad in asia, that's the word from the mouth of our own president. ever
society, and you look at this map and you look at europe and russia. >> yes. europe is not just a debt crisis. we've been narcissistically focusing on a debt crisis. it's the western extrim city of the super continent and most changes in europe over the mill len ya have come from the east. they've come from the influx of peoples throughout the east. and we thought we had defeated that with the end of the cold war, that russia was out of it. but that's not the case. precisely because this belt of countries from estonia to bull gary are right next door to russia. russia will continue to be a factor in europe's evolution. if you look at russia, it's half the longitudes of the world but it's got less people than ban ga desh. it's been invaded by poles, electricity yanians, swedes. so russia still requires buffer zones in eastern europe and the caucuses. vladimir putin is not the totalitarian eastern giant the western union paints him as. his ne-yo imperialism is a function of his jeep geographical insecurity. poland, here in blue, may emerge as the real pivot state because, again, there's
now in terms of how will it be taken forward with russia and china? will there be confrontation? the question that's going to be asked and needs to be asked is because strategy is needed is to go to the russians and say basically, now what do you want? the president is there for four more years, no more elections, what is it that you want? deliver what the russians or not? cold war they want or what is -- what consequences of that? from what i understand the foreign minister of russia was meeting with the gulf ministers, the gcc ministers, i, from what my information is he did not give in. they are standing exactly where they were. this is not -- the strategy is needed. it is not a strategy, and the u.s., no matter how much we try to run away from that situation in syria and israel and iran, it's, yeah, light footed or heavy footed, leadership is needed. >> one follow-up question. do you see the current situation, you talked about the instability and opportunity as they say in america, an opportunity to change the channel. is it likely an opportunity for assad to change the chan
won. that is the first myth. frankly, of russia won it. secondly common and and and and now we have the atomic bomb. new -- secondly, we have the atomic bomb. these are myths we explode, but what results is this believe we are always in the right, and it has gotten worse from generation to generation. tavis: if oliver is right and we engage in this self love, what makes you think that of bowdon -- a book that they are going to want to digest that? >> you do not think it is going to change the world? we just want to start a conversation. we think people in the united states have not studied their history. the national report card, most americans think the united states is sufficient -- is deficient in math and science. high school seniors are weakest in u.s. history, and the public in general knows very little u.s. history. tavis: what makes you think we are ready for that conversation now. >> the united states is in a transitional time. we cannot dictate all over the world. we are just in the process of losing two major wars. it is a terrible war. if the united states gets involved
it would be the first such venture by a russian firm on the disputed islands. russia is stepping up efforts to develop tourism on the islands. the government has built a new airport and is organizing foreign sightseeing tours. japanese consular officials in yuzhno-sakhalinsk says russia may use tourism to gain greater control of the territory. >>> there's a storm moving through the northwest u.s. for more on the weather here's meteorologist robert speta. >> yes, we've been watching the storm here in the pacific northwest. it's been bringing some very gusty winds and heavy rains. well now it's going to start to pull here towards the east off into the dakotas. some improving conditions in around washington and towards oregon. then into the dakotas, stuff going downhill here. heavy rain, about five centimeters of snowfall accumulating. gusty winds, sometimes up to 90 kilometer per hour winds. ahead of that front, thick fog is being seen in the midwest. flights in and out of chicago, do check them out ahead of time because you're seeing some airport delays due to the fog. that's going to start
corner. >>> the united states facing russia and the u.s. fell behind one-0, and 2-1. late in the game, three minutes to injury time and deflects off the of the defender, the 22-year-old and he had the first international goal helping the u.s. tie russia 2-2 and geo gonzalez in the running for tonight's national league cy young award and the sophomore auto porter is not in the lineup tonight when they host liberty and suffering from a concussion-like simp ton. >> and he's a look at what is coming up at 10. >>> we're focusing on the manhunt and by a crime spree in d.c. talking about a sexual assault and several robberies within a matter of hours. where this happened and the clues police want you to see. plus, millions of kids nationwide are waiting months for a doctor's appointment. we'll tell you what is behind the severe pediatrician shortage and why a local college lost the national ranking in a prestigious list. the answer and campus reaction tonight on fox 5 news at 10. brian. >> and see you then. one last look at the forecast. jew sue. >> another chilly night at hand and seeing th
! >> the biggest geopolitical threat facing america you said russia. not al qaeda, you said russia. and the 1980s are calling to ask for their foreign policy back. (laughter and applause). >> jon: well, that was a little hackie. i mean that was -- that was a it will roasty. i wouldn't (bleep) your foreign policy with margaret thatcher's (bleep), come on! hickory dickory dock, your geopolitical understanding can suck my -- (laughter) sorry. that's -- no, please don't because then i'll do it again some night. (laughter) so the president had a good night. must have felt pretty confident because he was letting his professor or y'all side shine through. especially when it came to one country. >> we've created partnerships throughout the region to deal with extremism. in somalia, in yemen, in pakistan. >> jon: what? really? (laughter) pah-kee-stahn? really? suddenly you're a guy who's desperate to prove you once roomed with a foreign exchange student? (laughter) look, this is america, we don't use the pronunciation locally. we don't say may-hee-co or frahnce. mexico, france. pakistan. (laughter) all in
meaningful contributions now? the contribution does not have to be militarily? russia, i would suggest, should be called upon to step up and belly up to the u.n. security council. they should exert influence. day, i suggest, are the most influential at this time, and they have the ability, number one, to stop supporting this regime that is slaughtering its citizens, to stop, by its acquiescence, standing on the sidelines and letting it happen while the rest of the world realize its hands. >> how do you accomplish that? >> i think they can assert influence in syria. they are one of the few countries that really can at this point. iran, forget it. >> how? what they can support the security camera resolutions, which thus far we have been unable to achieve -- security council resolutions, which we have been unable to achieve. >> what i think we are talking about here is, where do we intervene? where do we not? what is the rationale for doing so or to not do so? i think it's got to be based on one fundamental principle -- our interests, our values, and our values are our interests. i say ab
] and in russia. 7% of the world's energy is here. -- 70% of the world's energy is here. briefly on human-rights, i do believe actually the great difference between democracy and dictatorship is simply this -- a soft assets, but an important one. and it does not have human- rights that i necessarily proud of, but india does have accountability. china can only become a modern nation if it permits democracy and if it permits secularism, that is equality and presence of trade. until then, it can be successful, but not monitored. >> i want to say three things quickly. i want to follow up on the admirals' comments. it is remarkable to many in the u.s. military that the u.s. is not ratified the convention. we had it pretty sincere effort to bring afford to the senate. we worked a couple of the votes short. i think senator mikulski for her support. i hope we will be allowed to take that up again and get that done as a country. it is challenging to make the case we're making, which is that these potential conflicts over territory should be resolved on the basis of principles when the final conven
? the united states and russia or is israel going to give them up? doesn't seem likely. >> listen, this was first thought about in many speeches made by president ronald reagan back in the early 1980s. he made these beautiful eloquent speeches about it. this was his dream. he didn't accomplish it. there was a big summit where he was meeting with the president of russia gorbachev and so this was his dream and now we cut to today where president obama is pickling up the mantel and one of his first speech, the first in prague, he made a big speech about the elimination of nuclear weapons. in his first term, he accomplished passing the new start treaty. i do believe this is a passion of the president's, president obama's. there's a lot of things, he has a nuclear summit meeting in d.c. which pledged the elimination of nuclear weapons. >> cenk: they did this treaty and made progress. that's great news. i am curious really, like is zero possible? >> it absolutely is possible. again, to go back about five years ago they called the four states, they used to call the four mothersman, kissi
in syria. we've seen three security council vetoes by russia and china causing many to call the u.n., essentially, ineffective in this crisis. so it's been the interplay of these three factors, i would argue, that has led syria down the path that it has taken. in terms of u.s. policy, u.s. policy is based on the objective of having assad, as president obama called for, step aside. this was back in august of 2011. the problem with u.s. policy is that it has continually been at conflict with itself in terms of how to achieve that objective while also achieving or protecting u.s. national security interests in the region. namely, i would argue, very understandable concerns about, about the impact of unseating assad and the potential for massive instability across the region. so at the crux of u.s. policy on syria, i would argue, has resided this tension of wanting assad to go but being concerned and fearful about how to achieve that objective while also seeking to maintain stability in such a volatile region of the world. now, the debate right now on syria is focused largely on this
countries like china and russia, along with our traditional allies and a number of other states across the world have stepped up to impose the sanctions together. and you saw in the intervention in libya. we're not only our traditional european allies but our arab friends also stepped in to intervene in their own backyard. that is not leading from behind. that is leading in a way that enables others to step up, share the burdens, and be part of the solution. i think that, you know, this president has adopted a very strong and smart approach to the american leadership using all of the instruments of our national power. the military, when we must, but also much stronger on diplomacy, economic instruments and so forth. when it comes to defense and defense spending, i think this is a big difference between the two campaigns. this president has put forward a very, you know, a defense budget that is strategic in that sense it is driven by strategy but it's also driven by the legal constraints of the law that has been put in place, the budget control act those passed by a bipartisan majority
, china, france, germany, russia, known as the p5+1, and the united kingdom have tried to negotiate with iran over its nuclear program. of sides have fumbled the opportunities to reduce the risks of nuclear-armed iran, and to prevent the risk of war, to reduce the risk of war over that nuclear program. since 2007, the u.s. and western intelligence agencies have assessed that iran is nuclear capable, meaning that iran has a scientific, technical and industrial capacity to eventually produce nuclear weapons if it decides to do so. and those intelligence agencies continue to this day to assess that iran has not yet made a decision to do so. intelligence agencies and independent experts also believe that starting from today iran will require several months to acquire enough this'll material for just one bomb and still more time to build a deliverable nuclear weapon. secretary of defense and a estimate it would take two to three years to do so. in the latest international atomic energy agency report, based on its ongoing inspections iran's nuclear facility, particularly the fordo enrichm
bought naval forces from the united states, from russia and japan all to honolulu where we had simulated a tsunami disaster. and these three great nations brought their fleets to honolulu exercising how to respond and alleviate that disaster. well, that was then. how about now? last year the united states released a new security strategy. most of you probably have not even heard of that, but i have to tell you this was a big deal. it was one of the fifth american security strategies that we have issued since the civil war. among the highlights of that security strategy was a strong statement that the united states had the highest economic and security interests in the asia pacific region. not in europe as has been for 100 years prior to that, than the asia pacific region. secondly, that we would maintain freedom of access throughout that region. in particular, we would maintain the sea lanes in that area, whatever the challenge might be. even as we reduce our defense budget, therefore we must maintain and would maintain a powerful navy, and that that navy would be charged with maintainin
russia, but criticism can be dangerous. president alexander lukashenko simply does not tolerate dissent, so many of his opponent's field force to escape abroad. great britain granted political asylum to a former deputy foreign minister of belarus this summer. the man was sentenced to prison in belarus and had to flee because he had taken part in protests against lukashenko, but some eu countries are no longer keen to take on the belarussian regime. >> the worst thing is the boredom and the uncertainty. the asylum seekers center where he has been living the past year is 7 kilometers away from the border. the town's solitary cafe provides some welcome relief. he is here because he deserted from the belarussian army when he could no longer face the beatings from his superiors. >>ehould say we are prepared to take up arms if there is no other way to contain the mass protests. in the name of the republic of belarus. >> he has gotten help from opposition activists, help that is desperately needed. >> he would face a terrible fate if he were deported, possibly be killed it would be made to loo
on friday. including bills and trade with russia. >>> don't drive if you're dozing off behind the wheel. the chp is trying to get the message out about drowsy driving. you can get a ticket for it. they are on the look out for drivers who might be sleepy. >> weaving outside your lane, sporadic braking, take the off ramp, get out and walk around. >> drowsy driving caused 3600 collisions, 32 deaths and more than 2000 injuries in 2010. >>> well frank and lawrence, next time someone makes a joke about women driver ares, you tell them this. women now outnumber men on the nation's road. the study by the university of michigan found that more women than men have driver's license. they looked at gender trends in driver's license between 1995 and 2010 and researchers say the findings findings of economic and safety applications, women are more likely to buy smaller, safer and more fuel efficient cars. >>> the iphone 5 just hit the market but there's already talk that apple is working on a newer version. according to a chinese newspaper, the iphone 5s will enter trial production next month. the re
and russia and they do of mexico. what is going on? >> there was a poll that showed most americans see mexico was a problem. they see mexico, they think of drugs, poverty, corruption. they do not see what mexico has become. security is an issue but they miss many of the other parts, the economic boom over the 20 plus years. >> some 6 million americans owe their jobs to trade relations with mexico. >> exactly. what goes under the radar is how tight the economy as. mexico is our number 2 destination below canada. an estimated 6 million american jobs depend on mexico. if mexico is doing well, so are the u.s. jobs. >> to you think they realize their jobs are dependent on the mexican economy? >> i do not. i think this poll shows the lack of understanding. many people had a negative view. almost as many people said, i do not know. they do not have enough information to say something about the country to the south. part of that is a lack of understanding of how important the economic ties are between the nations. >> most americans think about mexico, when they think about a comment illegal immigrati
. >> russia is a boogey man? that's like 20 years ago. it's not the place they need to be. they are trying to make a stand. >> and the war on terrorism has lost the political legs, so what it is you're going to use to beat the american people over the head on national security is very different now so the approach that the obama administration has been taking which is actually a workable approach when the world has changed as much as it is. >> and -- >> obama has done a great job on national security, the republican predecessor did such a bad job. that's a hard thing for the republicans to live it. >> and it's reflected in the deeper bench on the democratic side. there are so many people that can come in that are qualified and serve in the pentagon and other departments. the republicans would have been hard pressed to >> with the election over, -- known apartment sequestration must become the top priority. defense and non-defense accounts will take a 10% hit. threatening to tip an improving but still fragile economy back into recession. president obama's already exempted military manpower
but said he hopes the pe impact on russia's ties with the united states. israeli prime minister benjamin netanyahu has congratulated obama. in a statement he said he'll continue to work with the u.s. president to ensure interests vital for the security of israel's citizens. the two are divided over how to deal with israel's. mahmoud abbas also released a statement saying he hopes obama will continue his efforts to achieve peace in the middle east. >>> the lead officials in charge of china are gathering in beijing to chart the country's future. the communist party is about to begin its transition of power. hu jintao and other leaders who had been at the top for a decade are stepping aside. the next generation is taking over. the 18th congress of the chinese communist party starts thursday. the meeting happens every five years. delegates will approve new policies and appoint new party leaders for the five years to come. chinese authorities waited until the eve of the congress to confirm details of this year's gathering. nhk world's michitaka yamaka in beijing has more. >> reporter: chinese
for him to step down and leave his country. in an interview that aired node russia the president, bashar al-assad, declared "i will live and die in syria." he is living now and we hope for the latter soon, he has murdered 32,000 people. a day after the british prime minister suggested a deal that would allow the leader to go safely into, i'll as a end this civil war that began 19 months ago. jonathan hunt joins us now. one could argue that a safe way out is no justice for him but maybe it would stop more murders. >>jonathan: he certainly seems to have made the decision as many experts have said, this is a fight to the end. the end for him is going to mean probably as its did for muammar qaddafi in libya, death. in this interview aired today to part on a tv stay of english language in russia he said and i quote, "i am not a put -- puppet ," and here makes cheer he will not resign or leave. and talking about whether any western powers might ultimately put boots on the ground if syria, he says and i quote, "i don't think the west is headed in this direction but if it does, nobody can predic
arab ya and the united states and russia and the european countries. what happened in lebanon -- if left to themselves, lebanon -- which is another sad story -- they might have been able to compromise and come together as they did on a number of occasion before re '7s and '80s, and work things out somehow. find some sort of system and muddle through this. but as they say in real estate, location is everything. and lebanon being between syria and israel, and of course syria itself being on the border of israel, lebanon, iraq, south of turkey, you're not going to be -- you cannot be the switzerland over the middle east. are going to have outside influences which usually exacerbate the situation and lengthen the time of the civil war. >> and so let's talk a little bit now, shifting the perspective, to the personal connections that you have to the house of assad. i would love for you to give us a good feel for, who is this man who is the president and how did he change over the time that you've known him? seems like there was a definitive time around 2005-2006 that you say he shif
in the u.n., quite frankly. they did a good job on libya, but china and russia are walking all over us. i think she is more political operative than anything else, when it comes to benghazi. >> one of the questions here is really who in different parts of our government knew what about what happened? knew the faces about what happened in benghazi on 9/11 and did they share it with everybody else? >> obviously, it's very troubling that ambassador rice' rendition turned out to be incorrect. and we need to get to the bottom of that. >> you want to get to the bottom of benghazi, have you to get obam a. obama is the bottom of benghazi. obama is the bottom of the coverup. that's why i said that this dwarfs wortgate. this is a coverup that dwarfs watergate. there are four people dead in this. >> greta: just in, tampa socialite, jill kelley, at the center of the scandal, had her special friends of macdill i.d. revoked. it gave her easy access to part of the military base. but paula broadwell, a lieutenant colonel in the army reserves got her security clearance suspended. and the fbi agent who hel
efforts to persuade russia d china to work with us at the u.n. security council. i will take every opportunity to urge my russian and chinese colleagues to support the political and diplomatic solution to the conflict in syria. without such a solution everything that they and we most fear is coming closer, including ever-greater loss of life, instability in neighboring countries and an opportunity for extremists to pursue their own ends. the basis for such a political settlement is clear: a credible alternative to the assad regime is emerging that has the growing support of the arab league, the european union, the united states and an in's cooing number -- increasing number of countries, and we have an agreed basis for transition which all permanent members of the u.n. security council signed up to in june. but in the absence of that political and diplomat you can solution, we will not rule out any option, and in accordance with international law where it might save innocent lives in syria and prevent the destabilization of a region that remains critical to the security ofhe united
note just in passing that my wife's father, my father-in-law was born in russia, emigrated to the united states, like the rabbi and senator kohl's father. mr. president, it took four months but the republicans will finally realizing their way back from the fiscal cliff has been right in front of them all along. in july the senate passed legislation to give economic certainty to 98% of american families and to small businesses, to every american making less than $250,000 a year. for four months we've been one vote away for from a solution to this looming crisis. they've held the middle-class hostage to protect the richest 2% of taxpayers, people who enjoyed a decade of ballooning income and shrinking tax bills. one has to admire the president, who went out and campaigned on this issue. he didn't -- he didn't in any way walk away from the issue. he said that's how we're going to get our fiscal house in order. and independents by a huge margin, democrats by a huge margin, and 41e% of republicans support what the president asked us to do. now, reasonable republicans are coming
, the house had one bill on the agenda, the bill that would normalize u.s. trade relations with russia and that passed by a vote of 365-43. the senate has yet to take up their version of the measure. a capitol hill reporter fills in the details. >> sports of this bill normalizing trade relations with russia are saying it's long overdue and good for the nation's economy. why is that? >> well, it >> it will hopefully double exports to russia from the united states. it will go across a broad group of products. manufacturers are backing it strongly. it could be airplanes and parts associated with that. locomotives, chemicals, food, clothing. it seems russia likes u.s. products. we expect there to be good and quick growth. >> how is lining up to oppose it? >> it has wide support on capitol hill. even the administration backs the bill. it does seem to have broad support across washington and the country for businesses that want to export products to russia. >> with all of the legislation and that remains to be done in the lame-duck session, this is the first one. what are the prospects in th
the world war iii. host: let's go to russia. before the elections, president obama was heard on a hot microphone telling dmitry medvedev that he would have more flexibility after the election. what was he referring to? host: -- guest: romney is sent one of his sons to speak to one of the aids of vladimir putin. policy someone gets frozen during an election. russian policy, in particular. president who was prime minister during that time and now is president again. the relationship with russia has been somewhat fractious lately. secretary of state hillary clinton accused the russians of ridding their election. there were concerned for these popular protests in moscow where there was great oppression by the government and who lashed out at the united states as well. -- and putin lashed out. one of the earlier policies was for a russian reset, and attempted to take a relationship that was good at one. that had turned very fractious and taken from a basic transactional relationship, just dealing with things as they came out, to building a new, strategic relationship in russia. that has so
. the question was about to russia's role in asia pacific. russia was this year's host of apac. it will participate at the east asia summit. it is an important player in the asia-pacific region. both economically and diplomatically. it will continue to be so. >> regarding the president's trip to burma. human-rights leaders expressed concerns that this visit was too fast, too generous. their main concern here is that the administration is far leveraging the opportunity of the first presidential visit which can only be once to press for new reforms. has the administration been able to leverage this a budget -- visit for tangible foreign measures? would you like to be secretary of state? thank you. [laughter] >> thank you for those questions, josh. with respect to burma -- there have been remarkable progress. since we saw the president called them cookers of progress in the summer of 2011. you have seen the release of prisoners, you have seen the easing of the media restrictions, you have seen the infighting into the political process of the parties. we have consulted with stakeho
's wrong with russia? i said it's not russia, it's the soviet union. she said was that? but it's a big thing back in the late 80s and early 90s before it toppled. we were geared up to fight them and most of us have never considered iraq or knew who saddam hussein was. after that war was over, which when it was a foregone conclusion, the terrorists and they took us all by surprise. we thought they were rabble-rousers. never given too much credit. interestingly enough, all the buildings were built by the bin laden construction company and had the bin laden stamps and buildings. how's that for irony? after that, things kind of change. the world trade in their bombing and september 11, we all know what happened that day. i was flying up winning. we came back from the middle east from another rotation in the monday, september 10 was their first day back. the morning of september 11th is actually flying in it come down very, very early. somebody said hey come you got to look at this. remember the key not the first tower building, what morons could hit tower of that size on a clear day? i tho
four months. she landed in kazakhstan tonight along with astronauts from japan and russia. president barack obama monitoring the conflict in the middle east as he travels through asia. today in thailand, he said the u.s. is working with all parties to end violence. he made history becoming the first u.s. president to visit myanmar. the president wraps up his three-nation asian tour with a stop in cambodia. >>> state department updating hugh it deploys security for diplomatic facilities around the globe now. secretary of state hillary clinton and the defense department will monitor where forces are deployed so they can travel to help during emergencies, if needed. the change comes amid congressional hearings over how the obama administration handled security crisis in benghazi, libya. i'm don lemon. see you back here at 10 p.m. eastern. fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've ever wanted to do and ink helps us do it. make your
-day for palladium, supply concerns out of russia and south africa, also supportive of the platinum market. if you want to play these metals as a retail investors, look at the etfs. >>> to the action here at the nyse, bob pisani here on the nyse floor. last words out of your mouth were much better that yesterday. what kind of steady as she goes? >> even on the vans decline line. volume is light to moderate a heck of a lot better that yesterday. best volume in a long time. and a very strong european close. that was the big factor, big speculation again about spain being involved in perhaps the ecb coming and buying spam nish bonds, all vague speculation but helped the spam nish close and the european close. here is sector up today for the first time this month, utility stocks. they have been slammed on speculation on the fiscal cliff, of course, dividend payers have to pay higher taxes, the first time, sue, in nine trading sessions, the utilities on the upside a lot of the big utility names you see down 7, 8%. some of this, some of it is due to hurricane sandy but much on speculation on the fiscal
statute and it caused turmoil between estonia and russia and lo and behold if it didn't become a lot of cyberattacks on mr. linea shutting down their telephone networks commissioning down their banking systems, websites and so on. government services and so on. it was never proven of his russia doing it, but the conclusion is that the very least of his russian hackers. in the end, nato, who is very active in helping estonia understand this, nato step dad and ultimately there's a cyberdefense center both selection. estonia is the most connected country in europe. they are a leader in the government. that's when of the reasons why estonia is super interesting. i don't know how much my time -- am i good? >> you are good. >> i'm going to spend a couple minor on other ones. okay, so there's lots of incidents in my side of e-mail, targeted attacks to u.s. satellites. it looks like someone from china. i'm not saying chinese government, but someone through china for mr. cheney servers appear to have been doing the proof of concept. they were trained to see whether they could get him into the
combined. china, russia, france, the united kingdom, you name it, next ten. >> reporter: sequestration would not change that according to the center for strategic and budgetary assessment, it is not the size of the cuts, about $50 billion a year that would be so damaging but the fact that they would be across-the-board. panetta adds that except for military pay every program from the joint strike fighter military band was be cut by the same amount, 23%. >> it's absolutely a foolish thing to do. if you want to cut the defense budget that's fine. this is a foolish way to do it. >> reporter: in other words, if the pentagon were allowed to pick and choose its cuts sequestration might not be the disaster secretary panetta is predicting. david martin, cbs news, the pentagon. >> glor: pentagon contractors aren't the only one in with a stake in this debate. 120,000 small contractors take part in the federal marketplace. a market worth $500 billion. lowell vant slot is scrambling to run every conceivable raanning scenario for 2013. he's the military contracts manager for u.s. technologies which
multinational meetings of countries who oppose the scheme, including meetings that took place in russia and the united states. the bill before us directs the secretary of transportation to prohibit u.s. aircraft operators from participating in this illegal scheme. the bill also directs appropriate u.s. government officials to negotiate a worldwide approach to address aircraft emissions and to take appropriate actions to hold u.s. civil operators harmless from the e.u. emissions trading scheme. the e.u. needs to slow down, carefully weigh its decision to include international civil aviation in its emissions trading scheme. a better approach would be to work with the international civil aviation community through the u.n. international civil aviation organization to establish consensus-driven initiatives to reduce airline emissions. i'm pleased to see movement on the part of the e.u. to work with international community at i.k.o. to seek a global approach to civil aviation emissions. while the post ponement for a year is a positive sign, it's not enough to ensure u.s. operators won't be n
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